Bronchitis and pneumonia can be dangerous, but by studying the genetic structure of the bacteria causing it, EU-funded scientists have gained a better understanding of how genes work. Their research suggests that DNA is organized the same way in all living organisms a discovery that could be the key to new vaccines and drug therapies.

Bacteria

One of the smallest bacteria to our knowledge and source of many infections in humans and animals, seems to have the same genetic structure as all living cells. Discovery, conducted by scientists funded by the EU of the Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, shows that even in small organisms, genes are organized in groups that turn on and off together with potential implications for the design developed new drugs and industrial processes.

Through the microscope super-resolution and a technique called Hi-C, scientists – supported three projects funded by the EU, 4D-GENOME and could generate a map that shows how 3D Whose mycoplasma DNA is organized or conditioned. Their findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, Prove that genes are grouped into different domains even in the smallest organisms, and that they tend to act together.

We hypothesized that the genome of my mycoplasma may have an organization generally similar to other bacteria, but we were very surprised to see that he was also organized in areas,” stated Marie Trussart, lead author of the paper. This research shows that the organization and control of genes cannot be understood simply by examining the linear sequence of DNA in the genome. They tend to act together.

We hypothesized that the genome of Mycoplasma may have an organization generally similar to other bacteria, but we were very surprised to see that he was also organized in areas stated Marie Trussart, lead author of the paper. This research shows that the organization and control of genes cannot be understood simply by examining the linear sequence of DNA in the genome. They tend to act together.

We hypothesized that the genome of Mycoplasma may have an organization generally similar to other bacteria, but we were very surprised to see that he was also organized in areas stated Marie Trussart, lead author of the paper. This research shows that the organization and control of genes cannot be understood simply by examining the linear sequence of DNA in the genome.

A great technical challenge

Its chromosomes are five times smaller than larger bacteria such as E. coli. Unlike most bacteria, it does not have a cell wall, which allows it to be easily cultivated and genetically manipulated. However, because of its size, the project was a big technical challenge asked five years of work. But thanks to the expertise in terms of genomic structural MAF.